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Who Is An Instructional Designer?

 

Who is an Instructional Designer?

 

Instructional designers use principles of learning and

instruction to develop instructional materials and learning activities. They do this by using theory, communication theory, and technology to solve educational and training needs and problems.

  • ID focuses on designing effective instruction.
  • ID requires a balance of instructional design, psychology of learning, and technology.
  • ID is not about teaching.

 

Retrieved from http://www.capella.edu/idol/index.aspx

Retrieved from http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning_design/is-this instructional-design/


 

How Do IDs Do Their Job?

 

Instructional designers perform a wide variety of jobs aimed at delivery of effective instruction to maximize student learning and success. Below are some of the many skills of an instructional designer:

 

  • Work with subject matter experts to determine what students need to learn
  • Develop objectives and ensure content matches those objects
  • Revise and rewrite content to shape it for learning needs
  • Structure content and activities for student learning
  • Create media to support learning (e.g., visual aids for face-to-face, various multimedia for e-learning and online)
  • Develop assessments (note that this does not only mean tests)
  • Adapt instructional materials created for one format to another format (usually this is adapting materials from face-to-face to e-learning)

 

Retrieved from http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning_design/is-this-instructional-design/

 

IBSPI Competencies for IDs

 

Here are competencies identified by the International Board of Standards for Training, Performance, and Instruction (IBSPI). These standards give an sense of what and instructional designer does.

Professional Foundations

  1. Communicate effectively in visual, oral and written form. (Essential)
  2. Apply current research and theory to the practice of instructional design. (Advanced)
  3. Update and improve one’s knowledge, skills and attitudes pertaining to instructional design and related fields. (Essential)
  4. Apply fundamental research skills to instructional design projects.(Advanced)
  5. Identify and resolve ethical and legal implications of design in the work place. (Advanced)

Planning and Analysis

  1. Conduct a needs assessment. (Essential)
  2. Design a curriculum or program. (Essential)
  3. Select and use a variety of techniques for determining instructional content. (Essential)
  4. Identify and describe target population characteristics. (Essential)
  5. Analyze the characteristics of the environment. (Essential)
  6. Analyze the characteristics of existing and emerging technologies and their use in an instructional environment. (Essential)
  7. Reflect upon the elements of a situation before finalizing design solutions and strategies. (Essential)

Design and Development

  1. Select, modify, or create a design and development model appropriate for a given project. (Advanced)
  2. Select and use a variety of techniques to define and sequence the instructional content and strategies. (Essential)
  3. Select or modify existing instructional materials. (Essential)
  4. Develop instructional materials. (Essential)
  5. Design instruction that reflects an understanding of the diversity of learners and groups of learners. (Essential)
  6. Evaluate and assess instruction and its impact. (Essential)

Implementation and Management

  1. Plan and manage instructional design projects. (Advanced)
  2. Promote collaboration, partnerships and relationships among the participants in a design project. (Advanced)
  3. Apply business skills to managing instructional design. (Advanced)
  4. Design instructional management systems. (Advanced)
  5. Provide for the effective implementation of instructional products and programs. (Essential)


Retrieved from http://www.instructionaldesigncentral.com/htm/IDCPinstructionaldesigndefinitions.htm


Who is an Instructional Designer?

 

Instructional designers use principles of learning and instruction to develop instructional materials and learning activities. They do this by using theory, communication theory, and technology to solve educational and training needs and problems.

 

  • ID focuses on designing effective instruction.
  • ID requires a balance of instructional design, psychology of learning, and technology.
  • ID is not about teaching.

 

Retrieved from http://www.capella.edu/idol/index.aspx

Retrieved from http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning_design/is-this instructional-design/

 

How Do IDs Do Their Job?

 

Instructional designers perform a wide variety of jobs aimed at delivery of effective instruction to maximize student learning and success. Below are some of the many skills of an instructional designer:

 

  • Work with subject matter experts to determine what students need to learn
  • Develop objectives and ensure content matches those objects
  • Revise and rewrite content to shape it for learning needs
  • Structure content and activities for student learning
  • Create media to support learning (e.g., visual aids for face-to-face, various multimedia for e-learning and online)
  • Develop assessments (note that this does not only mean tests)
  • Adapt instructional materials created for one format to another format (usually this is adapting materials from face-to-face to e-learning)

 

Retrieved from http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning_design/is-this-instructional-design/

 

IBSPI Competencies for IDs

 

Here are competencies identified by the International Board of Standards for Training, Performance, and Instruction (IBSPI). These standards give an sense of what and instructional designer does.

Professional Foundations

  1. Communicate effectively in visual, oral and written form. (Essential)
  2. Apply current research and theory to the practice of instructional design. (Advanced)
  3. Update and improve one’s knowledge, skills and attitudes pertaining to instructional design and related fields. (Essential)
  4. Apply fundamental research skills to instructional design projects.(Advanced)
  5. Identify and resolve ethical and legal implications of design in the work place. (Advanced)

Planning and Analysis

  1. Conduct a needs assessment. (Essential)
  2. Design a curriculum or program. (Essential)
  3. Select and use a variety of techniques for determining instructional content. (Essential)
  4. Identify and describe target population characteristics. (Essential)
  5. Analyze the characteristics of the environment. (Essential)
  6. Analyze the characteristics of existing and emerging technologies and their use in an instructional environment. (Essential)
  7. Reflect upon the elements of a situation before finalizing design solutions and strategies. (Essential)

Design and Development

  1. Select, modify, or create a design and development model appropriate for a given project. (Advanced)
  2. Select and use a variety of techniques to define and sequence the instructional content and strategies. (Essential)
  3. Select or modify existing instructional materials. (Essential)
  4. Develop instructional materials. (Essential)
  5. Design instruction that reflects an understanding of the diversity of learners and groups of learners. (Essential)
  6. Evaluate and assess instruction and its impact. (Essential)

Implementation and Management

  1. Plan and manage instructional design projects. (Advanced)
  2. Promote collaboration, partnerships and relationships among the participants in a design project. (Advanced)
  3. Apply business skills to managing instructional design. (Advanced)
  4. Design instructional management systems. (Advanced)
  5. Provide for the effective implementation of instructional products and programs. (Essential)


Retrieved from http://www.instructionaldesigncentral.com/htm/IDCPinstructionaldesigndefinitions.htm

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